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bin 040000
dox 040000
src 040000
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tests 040000
tutorial 040000
xcode-demo 040000
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CMakeLists.txt 100644 3 kb
CMakePackage.txt 100644 1 kb
LICENSE 100644 2 kb
Makefile 100644 2 kb
README.md 100644 5 kb
RELEASENOTES.md 100644 28 kb
TODO.md 100644 0 kb
install.sh 100755 4 kb
mulle-bootstrap 100755 16 kb
mulle-bootstrap-dotdump 100755 4 kb
mulle-bootstrap.sublime-project 100644 0 kb
mulle-mingw-cmake.sh 100644 2 kb
mulle-mingw-cpp.sh 100644 2 kb
mulle-mingw-dumpdef.bat 100644 0 kb
mulle-mingw-dumpdef.sh 100644 7 kb
mulle-mingw-make.sh 100644 2 kb
README.md
[comment]: <> (DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE. EDIT THE TEMPLATE "templates/README.md.scion") # mulle-bootstrap, cross platform dependency manager using bash ![Last version](https://img.shields.io/github/tag/mulle-nat/mulle-bootstrap.svg) ... for Linux, OS X, FreeBSD, Windows ... for C, C++, Objective-C ... certainly not a "minimal" or "lightweight" project with ca. 10000 lines of shell script code ## Why you may want it * You program in C, C++ or in Objective-C, **mulle-bootstrap** is written for you * If you need to link against a library, that clashes with an installed library, **mulle-bootstrap** could break this quandary * If you feel that `apt-get install` pollutes your system with too many libraries, **mulle-bootstrap** may be the solution * If you don't like developing in virtual machines, **mulle-bootstrap** may tickle your fancy * If you like to decompose huge projects into reusable libraries, **mulle-bootstrap** may enable you to do so * If you do cross-platform development, **mulle-bootstrap** may be your best bet for a dependency manager ## Core principles * Nothing gets installed outside of the project folder * **mulle-bootstrap** manages your dependencies, it does not manage your project * It should be adaptable to a wide ranges of project styles. Almost anything can be done with configuration settings or additional shell scripts. * It should be scrutable. If things go wrong, it should be easy to figure out what the problem is. It has extensive logging and tracing support built in. * It should run everywhere. **mulle-bootstrap** is a collection of shell scripts. If your system can run the bash, it can run **mulle-bootstrap**. ## What it does technically * downloads [zip](http://eab.abime.net/showthread.php?t=5025) and [tar](http://www.grumpynerd.com/?p=132) archives * fetches [git](//enux.pl/article/en/2014-01-21/why-git-sucks) repositories and it can also checkout [svn](//andreasjacobsen.com/2008/10/26/subversion-sucks-get-over-it/). * builds [cmake](//blog.cppcms.com/post/54), [xcodebuild](//devcodehack.com/xcode-sucks-and-heres-why/) and [configure](//quetzalcoatal.blogspot.de/2011/06/why-autoconf-sucks.html) projects and installs their output into a "dependencies" folder. * installs [brew](//dzone.com/articles/why-osx-sucks-and-you-should) binaries and libraries into an "addictions" folder (on participating platforms) * alerts to the presence of shell scripts in fetched dependencies ## A first use So you need a bunch of third party projects to build your own project ? No problem. Use **mulle-bootstrap init** to do the initial setup of a `.bootstrap` folder in your project directory. Then add the git repository URLs: ``` mulle-bootstrap init mulle-bootstrap setting -g -r -a "repositories" "https://github.com/madler/zlib.git" mulle-bootstrap setting -g -r -a "repositories" "https://github.com/coapp-packages/expat.git" mulle-bootstrap ``` **mulle-bootstrap** will check them out into a common directory `stashes`. After cloning **mulle-bootstrap** looks for a `.bootstrap` folder in the freshly checked out repositories. They might have dependencies too, if they do, those dependencies are added and also fetched. Everything should now be in place so **mulle-bootstrap** that can now build the dependencies. It will place the headers and the produced libraries into the `dependencies/lib` and `dependencies/include` folders. ## Tell me more * [How to install](dox/INSTALL.md) * [How to use it](dox/COMMANDS.md) * [What has changed ?](RELEASENOTES.md) * [Tweak guide](dox/SETTINGS.md) * [CMakeLists.txt.example](dox/CMakeLists.txt.example) shows how to access dependencies from **cmake** * [FAQ](dox/FAQ.md) * [mulle-bootstrap: A dependency management tool](https://www.mulle-kybernetik.com/weblog/2015/mulle_bootstrap_work_in_progr.html) * [mulle-bootstrap: Understanding mulle-bootstrap (I)](https://www.mulle-kybernetik.com/weblog/2016/mulle_bootstrap_how_it_works.html) * [mulle-bootstrap: Understanding mulle-bootstrap (II), Recursion](https://www.mulle-kybernetik.com/weblog/2016/mulle_bootstrap_recursion.html) If you want to hack on mulle-bootstrap, I'd recommend to get [Sublime Text](//www.sublimetext.com) and [install the linter plugin](//blog.codybunch.com/2016/01/25/Better-Bash-with-Sublime-Linter-and-ShellCheck/) to use [Shellcheck](//www.shellcheck.net). It simplifies shell scripting by an order of magnitude. ## GitHub and Mulle kybernetiK The development is done on [Mulle kybernetiK](https://www.mulle-kybernetik.com/software/git/mulle-bootstrap/master). Releases and bug-tracking are on [GitHub](https://github.com/mulle-nat/mulle-bootstrap).